Bruce Lawson’s personal site

Why I would have voted for George Galloway too

My initial thought, on seeing that George Galloway comprehensively beat the Labour incumbent to get 56% of the vote in Bradford West, is that I could never have voted for a man who brown-nosed quite as zealously to Saddam Hussein:

But after thinking about it more, I realise that I too would have voted for Galloway. I like to vote, but there are not many parties I could vote for. It’s impossible for me to vote Tory; the Old Etonian facade on a bunch of swivel-eyed neocons is repellant. But I can’t bring myself to vote Labour, either; I think that its support for the Iraq and Afghan wars have discredited it for a generation. I was also shocked and hugely disappointed by its authoritarian zeal when the Labour governments attempted to introduce ID cards and increase the time police can hold people without trial.

I’m politically closest to the Liberal Party but couldn’t bring myself to reward Nick Clegg and Danny Alexander’s complicity in demolishing the NHS.

While I’m sympathetic to the Green Party’s environmental concerns, their suspicion of technology troubles me, as well as their support of mad stuff like homeopathy. (@dracos points out that they’ve changed recently)

It goes without saying that UKIP and the less-covertly fascist parties aren’t going to get my ballot box kiss.

So, if I lived in Bradford, while there there is no box to say “none of the above”, I would have voted for George too.

What a sorry state of affairs that is.

5 Responses to “ Why I would have voted for George Galloway too ”

Comment by Michael.

I hope you don’t mind, but I want to use this post as a soap box for myself for a bit. You see, you say you like voting, but personally, I don’t (the fact I’m threatened if I don’t vote is probably part of it, I’m a bit contrary).

One of the biggest reasons I don’t like voting is that none of the bastards really can be trusted. I had a conversation with a British lady once, who was tossing up between the Lib/Dems and Labour. She didn’t really want to vote Labour (for obvious reasons, I would suggest), didn’t like the SNP and, well… So I believe she voted Lib/Dem, and regretted it. For at least some of the same reasons you mention.

So far, since I’ve become eligible to vote, I’ve only regretted voting once. I’ve only voted once. The other times I didn’t bother voting, and felt much better about not supporting any of the bastards!

If there was a counted none of the above option (though I think it should be first and called “none of the below” or similar), I would feel much less disinclined to vote. (The fact that the government would still want to wave a stick at me…)

So, when you a bunch of options that can’t represent you, and you can’t stand yourself (lack of cash), what can you do? Well, do what about 50% of the people from Bradford did. Don’t vote.

I say, whoever you vote for, a politician will get in.

Comment by matthew

‘none of the above’ is the missing option. I think the only problem would be if ‘none of the above’ won – which I think is quite likely. It’s great that we live a in a democracy where when you have to vote for the person you dislike the least.

Comment by Michael.

I disagree that it would be a problem if “none of the above” won. I’ve thought about this a bit (a half written tract testifies to this point).

I think that the best option would be to simply have a by-election for all the places that elect “none of the bastards”. After (say) three of these (if people keep saying “we don’t want a politician to ‘represent’ us”), they have a revolution and throw the bastards out ;).

(Slightly tongue in cheek, but the principle is that we know there are better ways of running things. So let’s try one of those ways.)

Comment by Mathias

That’s ignorant. I don’t believe that thos fascists are really that worse than the socialists you sympathize with.

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