Archive for July, 2014

Reading List

Education for the teenage girl: classic movies

As the proud owner of a teenage girl who’s turning into a fine young woman, I’ve reflected on the various stages of parenthood:

  1. spending 49% of salary on baby food, and 49% on nappies
  2. bedtime stories
  3. grazed knees and reassurance
  4. helping with homework
  5. realising you’re unable to help with homework
  6. pretending not being sad when they say they hate you
  7. making them work for relatively trivial amounts of money so they understand that money is valuable
  8. being polite to spotty herberts with ludicrous hair and unstable voices (Teenage Boys)
  9. “this is a house not a hotel”
  10. “Bye!”

The daughter is pretty well-equipped for adulthood. She already excels in many aspects of the curriculum at Bruce’s Finishing School for Modern Young Ladies® – she can fart outrageously, think deeply, belch loudly, accept differences, kickbox and knock down arse-gropers, play guitar, say “no”, say “fuck off”, spin out a really good joke to entertain both friends and eavesdroppers on a bus, get a paedophile deported, support her friends, swear inventively and hold her vodka down.

So I’m beginning a programme of watching classic movies with her. Not worthy art films, just those that have a different view of life, are surprising, or beautiful, or don’t portray women as idiots or trophies to be won, or simply those you’ll feel embarrassed saying “I haven’t seen that” at a student party.

Here’s a list so far:

  • Some Like It Hot
  • The usual suspects
  • Evil Dead
  • Evil Dead 2013
  • Alien
  • Blade Runner
  • Apocalypse Now
  • Seven
  • The Big Lebowski
  • Un chien Andalou
  • The Others
  • Triumph of the Will
  • Kind Hearts and Coronets
  • Pan’s Labyrinth
  • Python films
  • Twelve monkeys
  • The Shining
  • Fight club
  • Sixth sense

Your recommendations (with a line about why) would be highly useful.

Poem: It is a hot evening in July

My university friend Richard was doing some paperwork at his house and found a magazine published in the late 80s with three of my poems in it, each of which I’d written to capture one single moment or emotion. For no other reasons than it’s fun for me to rediscover my younger self, and because right now it actually is a hot evening in July, and also because I want to pretend to be all sensitive’n’shit, here’s one of those poems:

It is a hot evening in July. You and I
lie, naked, on the bed. My cigarette smoke
dances in the sun’s fading rays, and hangs in the air
like angels, waiting. Are you awake?
Yes, it seems that you are.
You run your fingers through your raven-black hair,
slowly. Your eyes are half-closed. Your eyelashes are long.
Your skin is pale, glazed with sweat. Your lips are wet.
Stubble in your armpits. Nipples dark, erect.
One of your legs gently massages the other, so slowly.
Perfect.
I lie back, exhaling slowly, and kiss you.
But you do not kiss me.
I have often noticed this: you will reciprocate,
but not initiate. A clock ticks somewhere.
You retain fragments of a fractured innocence:
You remind me of a fallen angel. There are no words.
A smile comes to your lips and I say, What’s funny?
You do not reply.
It is a hot evening in July.

It is a hot evening in July:
humid; quiet. You sigh.
We breathe heavily, in unison.
The sound of next door’s radio
floats languidly through our window to the world.
You hum along, inaudibly. I light another cigarette as
you shift to your side to face me. I stare at the ceiling
and send a smoke ring drifting
which hangs over your head and dissipates.
Your hand rests on my stomach, your head on my chest.
My free arm around your shoulders.
I can hear your heart beat.
I can feel your heart beat.
Somewhere a clock is ticking.
You look up and smile to me; our eyes are solemn.
And then you kiss me and I could cry.
It is a hot evening in July.